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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  March 19, 2014 7:00am-8:01am EDT

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hello. i'm nik gowing with "bbc world news." our top stories, relatives of chinese passengers on the missing malaysian airliner are forcibly dragged away speaking to journalists. >> reporter: you can see there's a line of police here. they are effectively protecting the chinese relatives who came here to try to speak to journalists, keeping the media away. let's see if we can get through. excuse me, guys, i'd like to speak to the relatives behind me. why not? >> ukraine's prime minister and
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acting defense minister are on their way to crimea as pro russian activists enter the naval base in sevastopol. south african president jacob zuma under pressure for benefiting for a multimillion dollar upgrade to his personal residence. plus, more than 20 years after the death of hollywood legend marlena deitrich, some of her personal belongings go to auction. hello everyone. there have been emotional scenes at the airport in kuala lumpur in malaysia as frustration boiled over among families of people on board the missing malaysia airlines plane. at least two people thought to be relatives of passengers were bundled away when they complained about the lack of
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information. 12 days after the plane disappeared, there's still no sign of the missing aircraft. 26 countries are involved in the search operation covering two giant arcs to the north and south of the plane's last known location. the bbc's jonah fisher is at the media center where that confrontation happened. a warning, his report contains flash photography. >> reporter: there's a line of police here. they are effectively protecting the chinese relatives who came here to try to speak to journalists. keeping the media away. let's see if we can get through. excuse me, guys. i'd like to speak to the relatives. why not? why are we not being allowed through? can you tell me? you're live on bbc world. anyone here want to tell us why we can't speak to the relatives? anyone?
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what did you say, sir? no. you can see here no one wants to explain it to us. we can read between the lines. the chinese came here, they've been kept in a separate hotel from the journalists, they came here to try to speak to journalists, particularly chinese journalists. they have a sign complaining about the way they feel the investigation is going. obviously once word got around that they were here, there was a pretty heavy handed response. they've been taken away. obviously a lot of commotion because there's so many journalists in the hotel. now they're being kept back there. one would imagine they're trying to get them out of the hotel. certainly a message about how frustrated they are about how the investigation is going. we certainly felt that today, why the screaming and kicking when they were being taken away by the malaysians. >> during "the daily news" conference, malaysia's acting transport minister hishamuddin
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hussein said their feelings were completely understandable. >> i completely understand their feelings. this is something i discussed with the president this morning. -- also how to manage emotions and appease the families. sending another high level team and i hope and i appeal to everybody that we are trying our very best. >> one of the main points of that daily news briefing from the acting transport minister, he started by saying the international efforts in the search for the missing plane
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are, of course, continuing. he said some reports the aircraft was spotted close to the maldives islands in the indian ocean had been investigated and they have been rejected. he said the police investigation into crew, passengers and ground crew is on going. analysts are trying to recover data which was apparently deleted from the pilot's personal flight simulator at his home. well, what about that report from maldive now rejected and said to be untrue by the minister in kuala lumpur? the bbc's charles haviland. what was said to have taken place or been seen around the maldives? >> reporter: that's right. the maldives is a small country territorially but stretches from north to south, many hundreds of kilometers in the indian ocean.
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they were not asked to help track down the missing plane. reports have come out that islanders in the south central part of the arc pell go, several of them, maybe about ten of them reported spotting a very, very large airplane overflying very low. the timing may not add up. they were saying 6:15 local time, which would have been 9:15 in malaysia. the plane would have to have been going very slowly indeed to have been over maldives at that point. the authorities, national defense forces in particular are saying this was not spotted on radar and they do not really believe these accounts are true. but the fact remains about ten islanders are testifying to this having happened. i spoke to a local counselor on that particular island and he says many people have come up with this story and come up with saying it had red and i believe white colors, the same kind of markings of the malaysian
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airlines jumbo jet would have had. >> charles, thanks for joining me with that update of what was alleged to have been seen. we have to say the acting transport minister in kuala lumpur says it is not true. now to ukraine and the interim government there is sending acting defense minister and prime minister to crimea. the aim is to clarify the position of ukraine's forces after russia signed a bill to absorb crimea into russia. crimea's pro-russian leader says they won't let the ministers in. meanwhile, pro russian protesters have broken into ukraine's navy base in the port of sevastopol and hoisted russian flags. there are reports the head of the ukrainian navy has been detained by the russian security services. meanwhile ukraine's army is under orders to prepare to defend its territory in the east of ukraine. that is as russia builds forces across the border. the bbc's steve rosenberg
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reports from the village of michurino. where the villagers are worried about the military presence there. >> reporter: the village is a quiet, empty place. or rather it was until they pitched up. this is the 25th airborne division, one of ukraine's elite units, they arrived on sunday, set up camp and hunkered down on the edge of the village. they're here to defend their country, but they're not welcome. >> we're about 20 miles away from the border with russia. we found these ukrainian army units in a field. but the villagers who live nearby are angry. they say this puts them in danger and they've asked the troops to leave. after an emergency meeting of the villagers, the soldiers have been given their marching orders.
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their commander tells me he can understand why people are nervous, but the troops, he says, are only doing their duty, keeping the motherland safe. the local farmers don't agree with that. one of the officers said to us the russians have paid you, haven't they, to kick us out? sergei tells me, it's not true. look at my hand. i'm a worker, a farmer. i put so much money into my business, i don't need any conflict in this village. military convoys have run into trouble in other parts of eastern ukraine with pro russian activists trying to block them from reaching the border. it makes an already difficult situation even more tense. meanwhile at crossing points into russia, security was noticeably tightened. the ukrainians have set up these tent traps, and away from the official border post we were
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taken to see the trenches which have been dug all along the frontier, just in case russia decides to invade. steve rosenberg, bbc news, eastern ukraine. other news at this hour, south africa's anti-corruption watch dog is due to release a report in the use of government funds to refurbish president jacob zuma's rural home, about $20 million worth of work has been done to this house in northeastern village which included security upgrades. president zuma has repeatedly told parliament he used his own money. turkish parliament is due to reconvene for an extraordinary session after the main opposition party demanded a recall. a summary of a report outlining details of corruption allegations against four former government ministers is set to be heard. it could be unwelcome news as prime minister erdogan prepares
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for upcoming elections. protests of an impending trade pack with china. protesters burst in and used chairs and other objects. it would allow service sector companies in taiwan and china to set up branches in each other's territory. the death of the chechen leader in, often known as russia's bin laden has become a martyr and gave no details of how he died. his group is held responsible for a string of bombings in recent years. you're with "bbc world news" with me, nik gowing. still to come, report from the front line of nato's cold weather training taking place in russia's arctic back yard. dad, it says your afib puts you at 5 times greater risk of a stroke. that's why i take my warfarin every day.
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you're with "bbc world news" with me, nik gowing. relatives of chinese passengers on the missing malaysian airliner are forcibly dragged away while speaking with journalists. meanwhile investigators are trying to recover deleted data on the home flight simulator used by the pilot of the aircraft. pro russian protesters enter a ukrainian navy base in sevastopol. the deputy prime minister and acting defense minister are on their way to crimea to prevent an armed conflict. what are the prospects there for the ukrainian defense minister and acting deputy prime minister when they get to crimea? let's go to bbc's david stern in kiev. david, will they be let into crimea now part of russia? do they need visas to enter crimea which until two days ago was technically part of ukraine? >> reporter: exactly. good question of whether they'll
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actually be let into the region. we're getting conflicting reports on whether they've actually left or not. they were instructed to leave by the prime minister yatsenyuk. we've also heard from the crimean leader who said they won't be let in. there's a question on whether they'll be allowed to land or not. obviously the situation there is extremely tense at the moment. we're receiving reports that the head of the ukrainian navy has been taken away by unidentified men. we're not clear who exactly it was. obviously if these two top ukrainian officials do go to crimea, they are walking into a very tense situation indeed. >> let's all of us be scleer. what are the orders now to ukraine's military in crimea which was until two days ago part of ukraine, now technically part of russia? are they under orders to use deadly force? >> reporter: no.
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they are not under orders to use deadly force. basically the ukrainian government is sticking the the orders of the line they've been adhering to all this time, that the troops will stay there, that this is a part of ukrainian territory, will remain a part of ukrainian territory. they don't recognize the government there or referendum. obviously they don't recognize the access into russia. at the moment the troops are standing there. apparently this base in sevastopol has been overrun by these gunmen, effectively russian forces. there are a number of forces, ukrainian forces that are still on the base and are refusing to leave. >> what about finally the instructions and the orders to ukrainian forces now building defenses in the east of ukraine? we heard from steve rosenberg a short time ago, particularly after president putin in moscow said yesterday it's absurd -- my
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words, not his -- absurd to think russia has any ideas of doing anything in eastern ukraine with its military? >> reporter: well, the ukrainian military is preparing itself right now. they're in a partial mobilization, saying they're getting ready for whatever may come next. it should be said here in kiev, any words from putin are received with a great deal of skepticism indeed. obviously they said they weren't going to take over crimea. they also said these are not russian troops. but from everything we have been able to ascertain, as well as other news outlets, these are indeed russian troops. obviously whatever mr. putin has to say is being taken with, shall we say, a very large pinch of salt. >> david stern, live there in the center of kiev. let me update you on news i gave you a short time ago. there is now a report from an anti-corruption panel in south africa, a damning report released six weeks before the
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election. the controversial report has looked into whether president jacob zuma personally benefited from a $20 million security upgrade of his private rural home. the investigation follows investigations in the south african media that some of the public money was used to fund luxuries including a swimming pool and amphitheater. many south africans are unable to justify the cost of his lavish home. let's go to south african correspondent milton impose zi who joins me from there. milton, what did the report say? >> reporter: the 400-page report, nik, states that president jacob sooum a ma violated the executive ethics code, in other words, he went against the very code that guides ministers and presidents on how to spend on public funds. for example, the advocate leading the public protector's
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office states in her report that president zuma asked for a cattle crawl to be extended so he could have a larger one, but he was prepared to pay for it. of course, that didn't happen. now she wants him to reimburse the state for those costs, including the amphitheater, the swimming pool which some government ministers tried to describe as a fire pool. of course, she says that when he told parliament that he used his own family money to build his own home, he made a bona fide mistake because the constructions were happening from one contractor and they were having simultaneously, so it's very hard to say whose money was used at what point. >> milton, how much does the president have to repay? has a figure been wut on put on? >> no. that's what makes this report so
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complicated. she says that the president should repay the state a reasonable percentage of the non-security measures such as a swimming pool, amphitheater, cattle crawl and so on that were installed at his house. remember this installation was in excess of 200 million wren, a huge sum here in south africa for one president. >> milton, thank you for the update. now, let's move on with jamie and the business. janet yellen is now chairman of the federal reserve and she's in business. >> she's the lady who is in charge. she's in the hot seat after months of waiting and speculating. janet yellen will chair the second day of the first federal reserve meeting since she seceded ben bernanke on february 1st. the biggest challenge will be how she mannings the fed's shift
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from firefighting back to neutral. the u.s. central bank has already begun cutting large cash injections launched at the height of the financial crisis, nearly six years ago now. later today the committee will announce whether it will continue to gradually reduce the monetary stimulus program. a year ago this week, cyprus, the eu's most easterly state was trying to stave off bankruptcy. after tough negotiations they received a $10 billion bailout from national lenders. there was a catch. for the first time those with larger bank deposits were made to pay a higher price. their holdings were heavy skal pd and in some cases taken away entirely to help pay closing one bank and propping up others. later on "world business report" we'll hear from the country's business minister who says cyprus's banks are on the mend. let's have a look at the markets. very quiet. uk at the moment is undecided because we've got a budget
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today. the chancellor and finance minister george osborne is going to be talking. asean markets -- i wanted to look at the euro-dollar, it's moving towards 1.80. the euro very strong against the dollar at the moment. yen has recovered a little bit of strength there, 101.54. the other markets pretty undecided, quite quiet. generally on an upward bend. the markets wondering which way to go. that's the business news. thanks, jamie. marlena deitrich was one of the biggest movie stars of the 20th century. her hollywood career lasted decades. now more than 250 of her personal items are going up for auction. from hollywood, the bbc's alastair leithead. ♪
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>> reporter: marlena deitrich made the movies her own, bringing her style to the big screen and around the world. >> marlena deitrich, the ultimate fem fatale, sexy, sensuous, dangerous, all the things you want in a movie heroine who is somewhat mysterious. >> reporter: some secrets are revealed by her grandson, who is automaticing off several of her private things. >> a lot of things we haven't been able to put out. it's sort of pretentious having your grandmother on the wall. so it's been sitting in storage and in safe-deposit boxes and things like that. ♪ >> reporter: one of the most interesting pieces up for auction is a letter written by ernest hemingway to marlena deitrich, they met in 1934 on a cruise and had a relationship for 30 years. never consummated, they say, but if you read the letter he talks about imagining her on stage drunk and naked. it's all quite racy stuff.
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>> strangely, interest hemingway and her claim that the reason they never slept together is because they were never single at the same time. they were always in relationships and never hooked up for one reason or another. ♪ >> she reinvented herself. so it's extraordinary to think about she went from motion picture, she did cabaret, she went to las vegas. she donned men's clothes and looked absolutely fabulous and created a new fashion style for women. >> it must be quite strange, your grandmother being this sex symbol. >> well, yes. when you compare her sexual conquests to some of the people now, it's a bit tame. she did have that reputation, it was well deserved. she was androgenous, she had women girlfriends, she had men. she never got divorced, always loved her husband.
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she was very much an actress in the sense of when she was in those relationships she was playing a part in a sense. with hemingway she was a pal. if you knew her at home, she would scrub bathrooms and cook your dinner. >> the hemingway letter for $50,000, other watches, rings and other memorabilia are up for auction, a little bit of personal history. alastair leithead, bbc news. a man and woman, believed to be relatives of passengers on the missing malaysian airlines plane have been manhandled into a room at a media center at kuala lumpur airport. there were chaotic scenes when they started to protest against what they described as the malaysian government's hiding of the troop. a banner they tried to show accused the them of wasting
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time. 20 countries are searching for the plane concentrating on a northern and southern arc starting from the aircraft's last known position in the mama lack khan straits. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? life with crohn's disease ois a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps come back? what if the plane gets delayed? what if i can't hide my symptoms? what if? but what if the most important question
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with "bbc world news," our top stories. >> relatives of chinese passengers on the missing malaysian airliner forcibly dragged away while speaking with journalists. >> reporter: you can see here there's a line of police here. they are effectively protecting the chinese relatives who came here to try to speak to journalists, keeping the media away. let's see if we can get through. excuse me, guys, i'd like to go speak to the relatives -- hundreds of pro russian activists storm the ukrainian
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navy base in sevastopol. two ukrainian government ministers travel to crimea to try to prevent an armed conflict. south africa's president jacob zuma under pressure. a report finds he unduly benefited with a multimillion dollar upgrade to his private residence. israeli has carried out a an air strike. there have been emotional scenes at the airport in kuala lumpur as frustration boiled over among families on board the missing malaysian airlines plane. at least two people thought to be relatives of passengers were bundled away when they complained to journalists about the lack of information.
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12 days since the plane disappeared, there's still no sign of the missing airliner, mh370. 26 countries are now involved in the search operation. that covers two giant a to the north and the south of the plane's last known location. the bbc's jonah fisher is at the media center where that confrontation happened. a warning, his report contains flashing images. >> reporter: you can see there's a line of police here. they are effectively protecting the chinese relatives who came here to try to speak to journalists, keeping the media away. let's see if we can get through. excuse me, guys, i'd like to speak to the relatives behind me. why not? why are we not being allowed through? you're live on "bbc world news." anyone here, can you tell us why we can't speak to the relatives? anyone? what did you say, sir? no. you can see there no one wants
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to explain it to us. we can read between the lines. the chinese came here, they've been kept in a separate hotel from the journalists. they came here to try to speak to journalists, particularly chinese journalists. they have a sign complaining about the way they feel the investigation is going. obviously once word got around that they were here, a pretty heavy-handed response. they've been taken away. obviously commotion because there are so many journalists here in the hotel. obviously now they're being kept back here. one would imagine they're trying to get them out of the hotel and somewhere else. certainly the message of how frustrated they are about how the investigation is going, we certainly felt that today, the screaming and kicking while they were being taken away by the malaysians. >> during "the daily news" conference, malaysia's acting transport minister hishamuddin hussein was being made aware of
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what was going on with the relatives and said their feelings were understandable. >> i completely understand what they're going through. this is something that i discussed with the president this morning. earlier in the statement i said one of our main priorities also is how to manage emotions and how to appease the families. sending another high level team [ inaudible ]. i hope and i appeal to everybody that they understand that we are trying our very best. >> so what else's merged from malaysia's acting transport minister? not much, but he did start by saying the international efforts in the search for the missing
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plane will continue. he said some reports the aircraft was spotted over the maldives have been investigated and rejected. he said the police investigation into crew, passengers and ground staff is on going. analysts are, he said, trying to recover data which was apparently deleted from the pilot's personal flight simulator. meanwhile there was speculation in recent days that the plane landed somewhere close to the many islands of the nation's state of maldives in the indian ocean. but the transportation minister said, quote, these reports are untrue. they've investigated them with the officials from the maldives. the bbc's charles haviland is in sri lanka. i asked him what was said to have taken place around the maldives.
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>> reporter: reports have come out that islanders in the south central part of the arc pell go, several of them, maybe about ten of them reported spotting a very, very large airplane over flying very low on the morning of the 8th of march. the timing may not add up. they're saying it was about 6:15 local time which i think would have been 9:15 in malaysia. the plane would have to have been going very slowly indeed to have been over maldives at that point. the maldives authorities, national defense forces in particular are saying this is not spotted on radar and they do not really believe these accounts are true. but the fact remains that about ten islanders are testifying this having happened. i spoke to a local counselor on that particular island and he said many people have come up with this story and come up with saying it had red and i believe white colors, the same kind of
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markings, the same livery that the malaysian airlines jumbo jet would have had. >> the view from columbo, what didn't happen in the mole december. the bbc's jennifer pack joining us from kuala lumpur. >> reporter: you have to understand this is an unprecedented situation that this whole disappearance of the aircraft is baffling, not just for malaysian officials but also international investigators who are here to help the malaysians. there, of course, seems to be a gap in how the malaysian officials are conveying their message. i certainly don't think people disagree with their point that they do want to triple check the information before they release it. unfortunately it's not coming fast enough. you can see there's frustration with journalists who are crowding around the chinese family members and also frustration from the families who have been brought here to kuala lumpur to try to get the latest information.
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unfortunately, what is coming out is trickling out bit by bit, sometimes contradicted by top level officials. it has been a frustrating time. here is where we're at. we're in week two of the search and it has been stalled because they have now redefined completely new boundaries for where this plane could possibly be. and also, now, you're talking about it crisscrossing over 11 countries that require some diplomatic openings. officials say they have all these aircraft and vessels on standby and need the go-ahead which means that the search has barely even begun. it's been frustrating for the family members, heartbreaking. now malaysian officials say this is a criminal investigation, they believe the flight was deliberately diverted away by somebody who had knowledge of flying. now that means their loved ones on board are also potential suspects in this investigation. >> jennifer, how much is the
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natural assumption of the malaysian government that they control information, how much is that now really being tested, that traditional culture in malaysia, given the pressures now from the media and now the relatives? >> reporter: it has been tested enormously. i can tell you i've been living here for four years and the governing coalition has been in power for more than five decades. the traditional media shrinked to the governing coalition so it's easy for them to control the message. this time not so easy. we have national journalists here pressing for answers, family members asking for answers. i have to put this into context. this is unprecedented that they are even -- you have the defense minister as well as the acting transport minister fronting these press conferences. the head of the armed forces chief, head of the civil aviation department coming out to give press conferences.
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when it comes to this in malaysia it is seen as transparency because this is unprecedented access that the journalists have here in malaysia. i've not seen this in the four years i have been here. >> jennifer, thank you very much indeed for that fascinating insight. jennifer pak in kuala lumpur. several hundred armed pro russian activists have stormed the navy base in sevastopol, a day after russia moved to annex crimea. two government ministers from kiev are traveling to crimea to try to get in and prevent an armed conflict. but the pro russian authorities have said they will not be allowed in. meanwhile, ukraine's army is under orders to prepare to defend its territory in the east of the country as russia builds forces across the border. steve rosenberg reports now from the village of michurino where the local villagers are less than happy about their presence.
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>> reporter: the village of michurino is a quiet, empty place, or rather it was until they pitched up. this is the 25th airborne division, one of ukraine's elite units. they arrived on sunday, set up camp and hunkered down on the edge of the village. they're here to defend their country, but they're not welcome. >> we're about 20 miles away from the border with russia. we found these ukrainian army units in a field. but the villagers who live nearby are angry. they say this puts them in danger and they've asked the troops to leave. after an emergency meeting of the villagers, the soldiers have been given their marching orders. their commander tells me he can understand why people are nervous, but the troops, he says, are only doing their duty,
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keeping the motherland safe. the local farmers don't agree with that. one of the officers said to us the russians have paid you, haven't they, to kick us out? sergei tells me, it's not true. look at my hands. i'm a worker, a farmer. i put so much money into my business, i don't need any conflict in this village. military convoys have run into trouble in other parts of eastern ukraine with pro russia activists trying to block them from reaching the border. it makes an already difficult situation even more tense. meanwhile at crossing points into russia, security was noticeably tightened. the ukrainians have set up these tent traps, and away from the official border post we were taken to see the trenches which have been dug all along the frontier, just in case russia decides to invade. steve rosenberg, bbc news,
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eastern ukraine. what about the prospects for the two ministers heading from key oef to crimea. the bbc's david stern is in the ukrainian capital and i asked him if he thought these two ministers would be let into crimea now that it is part of russia. >> reporter: exactly. good question of whether they'll actually be let in to the region. we are getting conflicting reports on whether they've actually left or not. they were instructed to leave by the prim minister, arseniy yatsenyuk. we also heard from the crimean leader, sergei october sewn nah who said they won't will let in. there's a question on whether the plane will be allowed to land. if it does land, what will happen after that. obviously the situation there is extremely tense at the moment. we're receiving reports that the head of the ukrainian navy has been taken away by unidentified men. we're not clear who exactly it was. obviously if these two top
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ukrainian officials go to crimea, they are walking into a very tense situation indeed. >> let's all of us be clear, david. what are the orders to ukraine's military in crimea which was, until two days ago, part of ukraine, now part of russia. are they under orders to use deadly force? >> reporter: no. they are not under orders to use deadly force. basically the ukrainian government is sticking the the orders of the line that they've been adhering to all this time, that the troops will stay there, that this is a part of ukrainian territory, will remain a part of ukrainian territory. they do not recognize the government there, nor do they recognize referendum and obviously they don't recognize the accession into russia. apparently this base in sevastopol has been overrun by russian forces. there are a number of ukrainian
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forces that are still on the base and are refusing to leave. what about finally the instructions and the orders to ukrainian forces now building defenses in the east of ukraine? we heard from steve rosenberg a short time ago, particularly after president putin in moscow said yesterday it's absurd, my words, not his. it's absurd to think that russia has any ideas of doing anything in eastern ukraine with its military? >> reporter: well, the ukrainian military is preparing itself right now. they're in a partial mobilization. they say they're getting ready for whatever may come next. it should be said that here in kiev, any words from mr. putin are received with a great deal of skepticism indeed, because obviously they said they weren't going to take over crimea and said these weren't russian troops. from everything we've been able o ascertain, as well as other news outlets, these are indeed
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russian troops. obviously whatever mr. putin has to say is being taken with, shall we say, a very large pinch of salt. >> david stern there in kiev. now some news coming in about madeleine mccann. she's the british girl who disappeared at the age of 3 from a holiday resort in portugal nearly seven years ago while her parents were having dinner. police now say they're looking for a serial sex attacker who is believed to have broken into 12 holiday properties. detectives say tracing the offender who struck between 2004 and 2010 is now one of the priority lines of inquiry. to south africa where an anti-corruption panel released a damning report six weeks before elections. the controversial report has looked into whether president jacob summa benefited personally from a $20 million upgrade of
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his private home. it follows investigations that some of the public money was used to fund luxuries including a swimming pool and amphitheater. many south africans are unable to justify the cost of his lavish home. our south african correspondent milton nkosi has this report. >> reporter: the advocate leading the public office states in her report that president zuma asked tore a cattle crawl to be extended so he could have a larger one but he was prepared to pay for it. of course, that didn't happen. now she wants him to reimburse the state for the amphitheater, the swimming pool which some government ministers tried to describe as a fire pool. of course she says that when he told parliament that he used his own family money to build his
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own home, he made a bona fide mistake because the constructions were happening from one contractor and they were happening simultaneously. so it's very hard to say whose money was used at what point. >> milton, how much does the president have to repay? has a figure been put on it? >> reporter: she hasn't put a figure there which is what makes this report so complicated. she says that the president should repay the state a reasonable percentage of the non-security measures such as the swimming pool, amphitheater, cattle crawl and so on installed at his house. remember this installation was in excess of 200 million wren, that's over $20 million, a huge sum in south africa for one president. >> milton nkosi there in pretoria. stay with us here on "bbc world
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you're with "bbc world news" with me, nik gowing. the latest headlines at this hour. relatives of chinese passengers on the missing malaysian airliner were man handled into a room while speaking to journalists. meanwhile investigators are trying to recover deleted data on the home flight simulator used by the pilot of mh370. hundreds of armed pro russian activists are stormed the ukrainian navy base in sevastopol. there are reports that the head of the ukrainian navy has been detained by russian security services.
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let me now bring you more on madeleine mccann who disappeared seven years ago at the age of 3 from a portuguese resort. that was nearly seven years ago while her parents were having dinner. there's been an important development from scotland yard. bbc's rob brumbe is here. what has emerged as this being part of pattern? >> we hear they're looking for a serial sex attacker who seems to have broken into 12 apartments in the region between 2004, 2012. on six of the cases the man is believed to have got into and sat on the beds of young children, children of holiday makers in that area, and on some of those occasions, four of them, there were sexual assaults. the chief inspector of the metropolitan police is saying this is an offender who has got
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a very, very unhealthy interest in young white female children. they also add that there's been some considerable frustration at the lack of speed in following the lines of investigation from the portuguese authorities. >> real concern, particularly for any white young girl in this area between the years 2004 and 2010 described as a priority line of priority. seven years on, why are they just realizing this? >> it is quite stunning, after all this when everyone feels that every line of investigation must have gone into this, something as big as obvious as this coming to light just now, it really begs belief. israeli warplanes have bombed army installations inside syria. it injured four israeli soldiers on tuesday. israel says it targeted a syrian army training facility, an army headquarters and artillery
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batteries. the syrians confirmed one soldier was killed and seven wounded. they accuse the israelis of endangering stability in the region. our middle east correspondent kevin connolly in jerusalem. i asked him about what happened to prompt this action by the israeli forces. >> reporter: these events began with the roadside bomb attack on an israeli army patrol. that's close to the line of separation which divides the two countries and has done so, more or less, since the war of 1967, and the events of that war are more or less confirmed by the middle east war of 1973. israel is left with a frontier fence very close to syrian territory. from that syrian territory from the israeli point of view, it faces the traditional hostility of the syrian regime, compounded now by the hostility of rebel fighters who also operate around that border area and also fighters from hezbollah, the leb
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bees shiite militia that supports the assad regime. it's become more complex over the course of the civil war, and there have been occasional incidents, occasional attacks in the past. israel has responded with artillery fire. this time there has been an escalation, because the attack was seen as more serious, israeli has used its air force. because it's targeted assets of the assad regime, we can say firmly israel blames the syrian government for yesterday's attack and is warning that any such attacks will be met with a forceful response, that, of course, the traditional israel view of how to deal with this kind of threat which it faces around its borders in the middle east. kevin connolly there in the middle east. let's take you immediately to what's happening in lithuania. there you can see on the right, the u.s. vice president joe biden. there you can see lithian's
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president. also is the latvian president. the reason why this is important is these are two of the three baltic states which used to be part of the soviet union. now they're members of the european union, members of nato and are deeply concerned about what they've seen in ukraine, particularly as all of these countries have significant russian populations, ethnic russian populations. we're now about to see the latvian president on the left there, we might hear from joe biden shortly. let's just hear quickly what the latvian president is saying. >> secondly, i would like to appreciate vice president joe biden to the baltic states. through for fulfilling your promise to come to us. it's very, very important in
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current stage. >> the important political symbol here is the fact that a u.s. vice president is there in the baltic states with concern there about russian ambitions given that president putin has made clear that he has long-term ideas of somehow reassembling the soviet union. going on at the moment in the baltics, u.s. voopt there. that's it for me, nik gowing. thanks for joining us here. bye-bye. check it out. i can't believe your mom has a mom cave! today i have new campbell's chunky spicy chicken quesadilla soup. she gives me chunky before every game. i'm very souperstitious. haha, that's a good one! haha!
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it's fine. everything's fine. nothing's wrong. it's all fine. excuse me! what day is it? saturday. saturday, good. good, i like saturdays. so, i just met rose tyler? yeah. but she's locked away in a parallel world. exactly -- if she can cross from her parallel world to your parallel world, then that means the walls of the universe are breaking down. which puts everything in danger, everything. but how?

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